Meetings

  • Meetings are held monthly on every third Wednesday* (except June, July and August) at the Big Stone Lodge at Dennis Johnston County Park located at 709 Riley Fuzzel Road in Spring.  This park is just east of Old Town Spring 0.2 miles east of the Hardy Toll Road, before you get to the Spring Creek Bridge (see additional directions and map at the bottom of this page).
  • The regular monthly meetings get underway at 7 p.m. with snacks and social time beginning at 6:30 p.m.  In 2018, our meeting dates are Sep 19, Oct 17, Nov 21 and Dec 12*.

* Please note that the date for the December meeting in 2018 has been moved to the SECOND Wednesday (December 12th) because of conflicts at the Big Stone Lodge.

Upcoming Meetings

  • September PWWS Meeting:

Join us for the first PWWS meeting of the season.  On Wednesday evening, September 19th, Carlos Hernandez will give a program on his photo safari trip to Kenya entitled “Birds of the Serengeti, Tanzania”.  (Social time with snacks provided is at 6:30 p.m. and the meeting starts at 7 p.m.)  The meeting takes place at the Big Stone Lodge at Dennis Johnston Park located at 709 Riley Fuzzel Road in Spring.  See direction information at the bottom of this page.

Carlos found it impossible to go on a photo safari trip chasing the “big five” (Cape Buffalo, Lion, Leopard, Rhino, Cheetah) and ignore the the birds of East Africa. Kenya alone has over 1000 bird species! Their plumage is as exotic and colorful as our tropical birds.  Of course, Carlos’ program will include some images of the big five and other mammals, plus our favorite insect (the African monarch butterfly) and other small critters…  But, you can count on LOTS of bird photos, too!

Leopard on a koppie. Koppies are rocks that were formed during thousands of years of geological upheaval. Photo by Carlos & Ania Hernandez
Little bee-eater. Photo by Carlos & Ania Hernandez
  • Lioness unsuccessfully chasing a cape buffalo. Photo by Carlos & Ania Hernandez

    Sacred Ibis on top of hippopotamus. Photo by Carlos & Ania Hernandez
  • October PWWS Meeting:

On Wednesday evening, October 17th, we are excited to welcome Texas Master Gardener & new member Suzy Briseño who will give a program entitled “Discovering Texas Native Bees”.  (Social time with snacks provided is at 6:30 p.m. and the meeting starts at 7 p.m.)  The meeting takes place at the Big Stone Lodge at Dennis Johnston Park located at 709 Riley Fuzzel Road in Spring.  See direction information at the bottom of this page.

Gardeners and naturalists may be well acquainted with bumble bees, honey bees and large carpenter bees, but what about squash bees, cactus bees, sunflower bees, leafcutters and green metallic bees? These are just a few of the ~1,100 bees native to Texas that many folks don’t even know exist. At October 17’s meeting, new member, Suzy Briseño, Texas Master Gardener, Naturalist and Volunteer Entomology Specialist, will give us an overview of some of the bees who excel at pollinating not only agricultural and garden plants but hundreds of wildflowers, grasses and other plants native to Texas. Landscaping tips and plant list will be given.

After moving to Spring, Suzy became immersed in gardening and soon became fascinated with the local bird and pollinator fauna with a particular interest in hummingbirds, butterflies and bees. Her sense of aesthetics changed after her research led her from concentrating on ornamental gardening to “wildscaping,” planting mostly native vegetation used by local animals. Incrementally, she transformed most of her suburban yard in Spring into a wild bird and pollinator habitat, building five pollinator gardens. Her home became both a Certified Wildlife Habitat and a Monarch Waystation, and soon thereafter Suzy received her Texas Master Gardener, Master Naturalist and Master Volunteer Entomology Specialist certificates. She is a member of the Native Plant Society of Texas and has recently joined the Piney Woods Wildlife Society.

To promote education about wildlife conservation, Suzy writes articles for master gardener and naturalist newsletters and in community newspapers.  She also edits the Facebook pages, “Texas Bumblebees” and “Native Bee Allies” and gives presentations on pollinators, especially the ~1,100 or so Texas native bees, to master gardeners and naturalists, garden clubs and elementary schools. In 2016, she taught the native bee segment of the Texas Master  volunteer Entomology Specialists course.

Bee grooming (arlon). Photo by Suzy Briseño
Cactus Bee (Diadasia). Photo by Suzy Briseño
Sweat Bee (halictidae). Photo by Suzy Briseño
Close up of bumble bee on coneflower (Bombus pensylvanicus). Photo by Suzy Briseño
  • Directions to meeting location for third Wednesday meetings (709 Riley Fuzzel Road, Spring, Texas):
  • Aldine-Westfield dead ends into Riley Fuzzel Road just northeast of Old Town Spring so there are several ways to get there:

    1. Take the Rayford/Sawdust exit and go East (right) on Rayford Rd. After about 4 miles, take a right (south) onto Grand Parkway Frontage Road / Riley Fuzzel Road.  Drive 1.4 miles to the Dennis Johnston Park (on the right before Hardy Toll Road and after the Spring Creek Bridge).  Turn right into the park & drive all the way around following the curve to the left until you reach the Old Stone Lodge.

    2. From I45, take Spring Cypress Road exit east and across the railroad tracks to Aldine Westfield through Olde Town Spring, turn left onto Aldine Westfield and then right onto Riley Fuzzel for a short distance to get to Dennis Johnston Park.  It will be on the left after Hardy Toll Road and before the Spring Creek Bridge. Turn left into the park & drive all the way around following the curve to the left until you reach the Old Stone Lodge.

    3. Take Aldine Westfield north from Mercer Arboretum until it dead ends into Riley Fuzzel. Turn right on Riley Fuzzel, go under the Hardy Toll Road freeway and turn left into Dennis Johnston Park (before the Spring Creek Bridge).  Drive all the way around following the curve to the left until you reach the Old Stone Lodge.

    Watch for a sign for the Park on the north side of Riley Fuzzel. You will need to drive all the way back to the Lodge and the parking next to it.